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6 Items In Your Bedroom That Can Actually Make it Dirtier - thespruce.com
thespruce.com
27.05.2024 / 14:55

6 Items In Your Bedroom That Can Actually Make it Dirtier

No one wants to think of their bedroom as a breeding ground for dirt and clutter. After all, sleep spaces should be zen, cozy, and welcoming—they're where we hope to unwind after a busy day and wake up feeling fresh.

7 Home Items That Are Actually Dirtier Than You Think - thespruce.com
thespruce.com
26.05.2024 / 11:47

7 Home Items That Are Actually Dirtier Than You Think

A deep clean of your home calls for a celebration—that takes a lot of time and energy! But, even with sparkling-clean surfaces surrounding you, there are some commonly missed (but very dirty) spots around your home.

When Is The Best Time Of Day To Mow Your Lawn? An Expert Weighs In - southernliving.com - Georgia
southernliving.com
24.05.2024 / 01:09

When Is The Best Time Of Day To Mow Your Lawn? An Expert Weighs In

<use xlink:href="#trending-icon" href="#trending-icon" xmlns:xlink=«http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink»> Trending Videos

Cicadas Are Here! Experts Share How to Protect Your Plants - thespruce.com - Usa
thespruce.com
23.05.2024 / 21:23

Cicadas Are Here! Experts Share How to Protect Your Plants

As the weather warms up, bugs start coming out—it’s a simple and well-known truth. For home gardeners especially, cicadas can be tricky to deal with. Found commonly in the American South, these insects occupy treetops as summer approaches and the air becomes humid.

Why "No Mow May” Doesn't Really Work, According to an Expert - thespruce.com
thespruce.com
18.05.2024 / 11:27

Why "No Mow May” Doesn't Really Work, According to an Expert

If you are interested in pollinator-friendly garden practices and sustainable landscaping, you’ve probably heard of “No Mow May” before. The campaign encourages homeowners to retire their lawnmowers in May to help native pollinators as they emerge from hibernation. 

Easy does it: adaptive reuse yields regenerative landscapes, with apiary studio - awaytogarden.com
awaytogarden.com
18.05.2024 / 10:57

Easy does it: adaptive reuse yields regenerative landscapes, with apiary studio

LANDSCAPE DESIGN may be part of the green industry, but sometimes rethinking a garden space (or creating a garden where there didn’t used to be one) can create a lot of very un-green waste material—especially true when you’re designing in an urban setting.

BHG Editors' Favorite Finds: What We're Loving in May 2024 - bhg.com
bhg.com
17.05.2024 / 23:07

BHG Editors' Favorite Finds: What We're Loving in May 2024

With the first official day of summer only a few weeks away, the editors at BHG have been gathering warm-weather essentials in anticipation for the months ahead—and we're sharing them with you! Prep for summer entertaining with suggestions from our home and food editors, including a genius charcuterie board that comes with compartments for all your favorite meats and cheeses. Spruce up your summer tablescape with checkered linen napkins, or take the party on-the-go with a padded cooler bag that's perfect for picnics.

How Long Does it Take for Potatoes to Grow? - savvygardening.com - France
savvygardening.com
15.05.2024 / 15:47

How Long Does it Take for Potatoes to Grow?

If you’re like me as soon as you plant your seed potatoes you’re already anticipating the harvest of tender tubers. However, potatoes are a long season crop and you’ll have to practice patience. So how long does it take for potatoes to grow? Generally the potato growing season is three to four months, but there are a few strategies you can do to encourage an early harvest. In this article you’ll learn about the different types of potatoes, which ones grow the fastest, and discover six ways to speed up the homegrown harvest. Types of potatoes Potatoes are categorized according to the length of their growing season. To ensure the longest season of homeg

Nine ways to participate in No Mow May | House & Garden - houseandgarden.co.uk
houseandgarden.co.uk
14.05.2024 / 14:47

Nine ways to participate in No Mow May | House & Garden

During May, the charity Plantlife encourages people not to mow their lawns. As well as attracting and helping wildlife, it's an opportunity to enjoy the sight of flowers blooming in long grass. Observing what appears – from interesting wildflowers (orchids, perhaps) to wildlife (such as grasshoppers) – is fun and, obviously, No Mow saves a lot of time. However, going the whole hog isn't for everyone. Those with children who enjoy careering around the lawn and people who entertain in their gardens won't want to let all their grass grow long. Therefore, a smaller No Mow area is more appealing and something that can be kept up throughout the summer.

How to start a kitchen garden: what to do in May | House & Garden - houseandgarden.co.uk
houseandgarden.co.uk
14.05.2024 / 14:47

How to start a kitchen garden: what to do in May | House & Garden

May is historically the hungry gap in the vegetable garden, because it is the time when the winter crops run out and before the summer crops get going. If you have been well organised, you may have some early crops of salad leaves, broad beans, radishes and even strawberries to harvest towards the end of the month – as well as asparagus, which is at its prime now. But the main focus this month is the sowing, nurturing and tending of your crops, as growth accelerates. Potatoes should be earthed up so the tubers are not exposed to light, while peas and broad beans need supporting with pea sticks or canes and twine as they get bigger. Weeding must be done regularly (little and often is my motto) and, if the weather is dry, watering is essential. It is best done as a thorough soak every few days rather than a scant daily sprinkling. At the start of May, I sow tender crops like tomatoes, cucumbers and courgettes in seed trays and individual pots. I keep these in the greenhouse until later in the month, when it has warmed up and they can go outside. As the month goes on, the focus shifts to planting out. I find it very satisfying to be able to plant a neat row of seedlings along a garden line, rather than try the lottery of direct sowing into the ground, then thinning out. Using the no-dig method, I will have already prepared my beds with a layer of well-rotted compost. Just before planting out, I will rake the bed to break down any larger clods and give the seedlings a better chance of establishing.

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